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Thread: Class action lawsuit on the way against Reno hotels, regarding resort fees

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    Owner Dan Druff's Avatar
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    Class action lawsuit on the way against Reno hotels, regarding resort fees

    A Pennsylvania law firm, Berger & Montague, is putting together a class action lawsuit against hotels in Reno which charged mandatory resort fees.

    It is not clear why they are only focusing upon Reno. Click this link to join the class, but only if you have paid resort fees at one or more of the following hotes:

    Atlantis (Reno)
    Grand Sierra
    Harrah's Reno
    Nugget Casino (Reno)
    Peppermill Reno
    Sand's Regency Hotel

    I hope this lawsuit comes to pass, and is successful. And I hope more like it follow.

    Resort fees are a total scam. They exist to hide the true price of the room in internet search engines. They should be illegal.

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    Gold Jayjami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post
    A Pennsylvania law firm, Berger & Montague, is putting together a class action lawsuit against hotels in Reno which charged mandatory resort fees.

    It is not clear why they are only focusing upon Reno. Click this link to join the class, but only if you have paid resort fees at one or more of the following hotes:

    Atlantis (Reno)
    Grand Sierra
    Harrah's Reno
    Nugget Casino (Reno)
    Peppermill Reno
    Sand's Regency Hotel

    I hope this lawsuit comes to pass, and is successful. And I hope more like it follow.

    Resort fees are a total scam. They exist to hide the true price of the room in internet search engines. They should be illegal.
    If you don’t like resort fees, simply don’t patronize establishments that charge them. Why do you want the government to solve this “problem” instead of market forces? I thought you were a conservative.

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    Owner Dan Druff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjami View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post
    A Pennsylvania law firm, Berger & Montague, is putting together a class action lawsuit against hotels in Reno which charged mandatory resort fees.

    It is not clear why they are only focusing upon Reno. Click this link to join the class, but only if you have paid resort fees at one or more of the following hotes:

    Atlantis (Reno)
    Grand Sierra
    Harrah's Reno
    Nugget Casino (Reno)
    Peppermill Reno
    Sand's Regency Hotel

    I hope this lawsuit comes to pass, and is successful. And I hope more like it follow.

    Resort fees are a total scam. They exist to hide the true price of the room in internet search engines. They should be illegal.
    If you don’t like resort fees, simply don’t patronize establishments that charge them. Why do you want the government to solve this “problem” instead of market forces? I thought you were a conservative.
    Because the resort fees are there for the purpose of misleading the public into believing they are getting a cheaper price than they are in reality.

    Resort fees are not simply an addition to the price point which can figure into the consumer's desire to purchase or not purchase the hotel room.

    They exist solely to allow hotels to publish a false price on the internet, without violating existing law.

    It won't be long before we see hotels for $10 per night with $150 resort fees. We already have some hotels in Vegas where the resort fees exceed the base cost of the room. Thus your "$20" hotel room ends up as $60, and you only know this once you read the fine print.

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    Gold Jayjami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjami View Post
    If you don’t like resort fees, simply don’t patronize establishments that charge them. Why do you want the government to solve this “problem” instead of market forces? I thought you were a conservative.
    Because the resort fees are there for the purpose of misleading the public into believing they are getting a cheaper price than they are in reality.

    Resort fees are not simply an addition to the price point which can figure into the consumer's desire to purchase or not purchase the hotel room.

    They exist solely to allow hotels to publish a false price on the internet, without violating existing law.

    It won't be long before we see hotels for $10 per night with $150 resort fees. We already have some hotels in Vegas where the resort fees exceed the base cost of the room. Thus your "$20" hotel room ends up as $60, and you only know this once you read the fine print.
    Every time I book book a room in Vegas, the resort fees are calculated in the total price right before your credit card is charged. It is no different than a city’s hotel tax, sales tax, or parking fees not being advertised in the price. If you don’t like the way a business operates, you are free to stay somewhere else. That is the way our free market capitalist system works.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjami View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post

    Because the resort fees are there for the purpose of misleading the public into believing they are getting a cheaper price than they are in reality.

    Resort fees are not simply an addition to the price point which can figure into the consumer's desire to purchase or not purchase the hotel room.

    They exist solely to allow hotels to publish a false price on the internet, without violating existing law.

    It won't be long before we see hotels for $10 per night with $150 resort fees. We already have some hotels in Vegas where the resort fees exceed the base cost of the room. Thus your "$20" hotel room ends up as $60, and you only know this once you read the fine print.
    Every time I book a room in Vegas, the resort fees are calculated in the total price right before your credit card is charged. It is no different than a city’s hotel tax, sales tax, or parking fees not being advertised in the price. If you don’t like the way a business operates, you are free to stay somewhere else. That is the way our free market capitalist system works.
    Your answer was so tough to respond to that I decided to take almost a year to think of what to say.

    After 50 weeks of tossing and turning each night over this answer, I'm ready to respond to you.

    This is not the "free market capitalist" system. If it were, there would be no need for resort fees. They would simply publish the full price up front, and the best deal would win.

    The only purpose of resort fees is to mislead. Initially it had a dual purpose -- to mislead AND cheat both travel agents out of commission and cities out of tax. However, the tax dodge thing has long been stopped, and the travel agents are often getting commission on resort fees.

    So now it's really just there to mislead people.

    Much of our hotel booking comes from internet searches, often through aggregator sites like Trivago, or from large travel websites like Orbitz. Resort fees are in place to mislead the consumer into not being able to tell the actual price of the rooms he's searching for. If you see one hotel listed as $100 and the other as $110 (which are equivalent quality), you would choose the $100 one, only to find out at the end of the whole booking process that there's a $45 resort fee. Then you're faced with the unpalatable choice of either just dealing with it, or having to go back and all the way through booking the $110 hotel, and see what their resort fee is, so you can properly compare. So if the $110 hotel has only a $20 resort fee, it's actually $15 cheaper, and you would have picked that had you known. But most people don't go back to bother to check this, because it's time consuming and a huge pain in the ass.

    That's one problem. Another problem is that it's a price bait-and-switch. Perhaps the consumer really doesn't want to take the trip if the hotel is going to be $145/night plus tax instead of $100 plus tax, but by the time he gets to the end of the booking process and becomes emotionally invested in going (perhaps even telling his wife/girlfriend/kids that he's booking it), he notices the bad news about the extra $45/night. Again, it's an unpalatable choice to either bail out and let everyone down, or just pay the hidden-til-the-end resort fee.

    I'm surprised you don't advocate clear and direct price listings, where the consumer fully understands what he is going to pay at the time of search.
    What would possibly be a valid reason to separate the price into base price and mandatory fee, if not to mislead?

    It's not at all like government tax, because government tax is the exact same percentage for each hotel in each market, yet resort fees differ wildly. Additionally, government taxes are rarely above 15%, whereas resort fees are sometimes over 100% of the hotel base price!

    What if, at at the supermarket, each item had a hidden fee, but you had the opportunity to put back any item at the time of checkout if the fee made the price too high? Would you be cool with that system? Or would you say that the actual full price should be listed on the shelves?

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    Gold Jayjami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjami View Post

    Every time I book a room in Vegas, the resort fees are calculated in the total price right before your credit card is charged. It is no different than a city’s hotel tax, sales tax, or parking fees not being advertised in the price. If you don’t like the way a business operates, you are free to stay somewhere else. That is the way our free market capitalist system works.
    Your answer was so tough to respond to that I decided to take almost a year to think of what to say.

    After 50 weeks of tossing and turning each night over this answer, I'm ready to respond to you.

    This is not the "free market capitalist" system. If it were, there would be no need for resort fees. They would simply publish the full price up front, and the best deal would win.

    The only purpose of resort fees is to mislead. Initially it had a dual purpose -- to mislead AND cheat both travel agents out of commission and cities out of tax. However, the tax dodge thing has long been stopped, and the travel agents are often getting commission on resort fees.

    So now it's really just there to mislead people.

    Much of our hotel booking comes from internet searches, often through aggregator sites like Trivago, or from large travel websites like Orbitz. Resort fees are in place to mislead the consumer into not being able to tell the actual price of the rooms he's searching for. If you see one hotel listed as $100 and the other as $110 (which are equivalent quality), you would choose the $100 one, only to find out at the end of the whole booking process that there's a $45 resort fee. Then you're faced with the unpalatable choice of either just dealing with it, or having to go back and all the way through booking the $110 hotel, and see what their resort fee is, so you can properly compare. So if the $110 hotel has only a $20 resort fee, it's actually $15 cheaper, and you would have picked that had you known. But most people don't go back to bother to check this, because it's time consuming and a huge pain in the ass.

    That's one problem. Another problem is that it's a price bait-and-switch. Perhaps the consumer really doesn't want to take the trip if the hotel is going to be $145/night plus tax instead of $100 plus tax, but by the time he gets to the end of the booking process and becomes emotionally invested in going (perhaps even telling his wife/girlfriend/kids that he's booking it), he notices the bad news about the extra $45/night. Again, it's an unpalatable choice to either bail out and let everyone down, or just pay the hidden-til-the-end resort fee.

    I'm surprised you don't advocate clear and direct price listings, where the consumer fully understands what he is going to pay at the time of search.
    What would possibly be a valid reason to separate the price into base price and mandatory fee, if not to mislead?

    It's not at all like government tax, because government tax is the exact same percentage for each hotel in each market, yet resort fees differ wildly. Additionally, government taxes are rarely above 15%, whereas resort fees are sometimes over 100% of the hotel base price!

    What if, at at the supermarket, each item had a hidden fee, but you had the opportunity to put back any item at the time of checkout if the fee made the price too high? Would you be cool with that system? Or would you say that the actual full price should be listed on the shelves?
    Nearly a year to counter my arguments? It only took me about 5 seconds to formulate my response:

    Caveat emptor, bitch.

    You’re so funny, when some perceived injustice directly affects you, you turn into a socialist, and want the government to solve the problem.

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    Caveat emptor?

    So I guess according to you, there's no such thing as a scam or unfair business practices, and it's just "buyer beware" for everything, right?

    Very surprising coming from an attorney, especially one who didn't work for large corporations.

    I'm no socialist, as you well know, but I detest scams, bait-and-switches, and intentionally misleading pricing. Those engaging in such business practices are scum, and there needs to be legislation to protect the public from such dishonest behavior. All prcing on all products and services should be straightforward and honest.

    You are also in the extreme minority with this opinion. I bet if we took a poll on something like Reddit, there would be greater than 95% in support of legislating away resort fees.

    You still can't state their purpose other than to mislead. Customer-blaming attitudes like yours are what allow these companies to get away with shit like this, as the entire goal is to mislead/cheat the customer and make it feel like it was his fault for not researching it enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post
    Caveat emptor?

    So I guess according to you, there's no such thing as a scam or unfair business practices, and it's just "buyer beware" for everything, right?

    Very surprising coming from an attorney, especially one who didn't work for large corporations.

    I'm no socialist, as you well know, but I detest scams, bait-and-switches, and intentionally misleading pricing. Those engaging in such business practices are scum, and there needs to be legislation to protect the public from such dishonest behavior. All prcing on all products and services should be straightforward and honest.

    You are also in the extreme minority with this opinion. I bet if we took a poll on something like Reddit, there would be greater than 95% in support of legislating away resort fees.

    You still can't state their purpose other than to mislead. Customer-blaming attitudes like yours are what allow these companies to get away with shit like this, as the entire goal is to mislead/cheat the customer and make it feel like it was his fault for not researching it enough.
    If 95% percent of people disagree with me that’s fine. I am willing to consider that I might be wrong occasionally, a thought that has never entered your brilliant mind.

    Trump charges resort fees. Why did you vote for a scammer for president.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjami View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Druff View Post
    Caveat emptor?

    So I guess according to you, there's no such thing as a scam or unfair business practices, and it's just "buyer beware" for everything, right?

    Very surprising coming from an attorney, especially one who didn't work for large corporations.

    I'm no socialist, as you well know, but I detest scams, bait-and-switches, and intentionally misleading pricing. Those engaging in such business practices are scum, and there needs to be legislation to protect the public from such dishonest behavior. All prcing on all products and services should be straightforward and honest.

    You are also in the extreme minority with this opinion. I bet if we took a poll on something like Reddit, there would be greater than 95% in support of legislating away resort fees.

    You still can't state their purpose other than to mislead. Customer-blaming attitudes like yours are what allow these companies to get away with shit like this, as the entire goal is to mislead/cheat the customer and make it feel like it was his fault for not researching it enough.
    If 95% percent of people disagree with me that’s fine. I am willing to consider that I might be wrong occasionally, a thought that has never entered your brilliant mind.

    Trump charges resort fees. Why did you vote for a scammer for president.
    1) Didn't vote for Trump

    2) I don't believe he owns or operates these hotels, they just lease his name

    3) I don't even blame hotels for doing it at this point. It's become so common in the industry that you are at a huge disadvantage if you don't. Caesars proved this when they tried having no resort fee. The only way this BS stops is if the government simply makes it illegal, which needs to happen, and is what should have happened in the first place.

  10. #10
    If these Democratic candidates say that they are against "resort fees" will Druff vote for them?



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